Georgia 
Double 
Dutch

Click here to edit subtitle

About Us

 

ROPE, NOT DOPE!

 

The American Double Dutch League is the official governing body of the sport of Double Dutch, and administers and monitors competitive Double Dutch events in the United States and throughout the world.

 

Mission

The mission of the American Double Dutch League is to help young people acquire knowledge, devlop life skills and form attitudes that will make them productive and contributing members of society while empowering them with oppertunities to make healthy choices which exhibit confidence in their ablities to make appropriate decisions. The American Double Dutch League's challenge is to provide a program that gives young people all the standard components to see and grow--with successful young people being the positive result.

 

History

Double Dutch is a skip rope activity in which two rope turners turn two ropes in eggbeater fashion while one or two people jump within the moving ropes. It was historically a game played by girls.

Although there is no written history of the game, it probably originated from movements of ancient Phoenician, Egyptian and Chinese rope makers. The original rope makeres practiced their craft at ropewalks, which were built inside long workhouses near seaports. A ropewalk is a large space of 900feet or more in length. With a bunch of hemp around their waists and two strands of fiber attached to a wheel, the ropewalk spinners walked backward twisting the rope into uniformity.

Numerous strands could be spun at the same time. Runners traveled the cluttered floor supplying the spinners with hemp and often had to jump over the twisting ropes to make their deliveries. They needed quick feet, lithe bodies and good eye perception.

It was at these ancient rope walks that the basic framework of Double Dutch could have evolved. In all probability, the rope spinners, runners and their families patched together a leisure time activity for their children from their work experience (the strand over strand turning movements of the spinners, the footwork of the runners and odd bits of rope.) The game was passed on through generations of seafaring and maritime colonies.

Dutch settlers of America brought the game to the Hudson River trading town of New Amsterdam. When the English arrived and saw the children playing their two-rope game, they called it Double Dutch, and English slang term that came to mean anything the Dutch were saying or doing that was confusing or unintelligible to the English.

Since this apparent beginning, the activity grew over the years, primarily in the cities as a game for girls. It became a favorite pastime to sing rhyme while turning and jumping. After World War ll, mothers and neighbors often saw the game on the sidewalks of New York City in front of apartment houses where chidren could be safely watched. The girls used clothesline rope discarded by their mothers. But by the late 1950's, the radio music boom, the dangers of sidewalk play and the lack of recreational areas close to apartment building had made the game nearly extinct.

In 1973, several New York City Police Officers and physical education teachers Mr. David Walker and Mr. Mike Williams, designed the present-day sport of Double Dutch. The American Double Dutch League was formed and the first Double Dutch competion was conducted at the Frederick Douglas Academy (formerly Intermediate School 10) in Harlem. For the next ten years, the Annual World Invitational Double Dutch Tournament was held at the Lincoln Center in New York City.

Beginning in 1985 The Championships have been held at the following sites:

1985 - Liberty Plaza, Philadelphia, PA
1986 - The Hartford Civic Center, Hartford CT
1987 - George Washington University, Washington, DC
1988 - University of Maryland, College Park, MD
1989 - Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL
1990 - Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC
1991 - University of Maryland, College Park, MD
1992 - Ohio Exposition Center, Columbus, OH
1993 - Columbia University, New York, NY
1994 - University of Maryland, College Park, MD
1995 - Charleston Southern University, SC
1996 - Savannah State University, Savannah, SC
1997 - Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA
1998 - Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA
1999 - Trinity College, Hartford, CT
2000 - Stony Brook University, Long Island, NY
2001 - Bowie State University, Bowie MD
2002 - Sumter County Exhibition Center, Sumter, SC
2003 - Sumter County Exhibition Center, Sumter, SC
2004 - Sumter County Exhibition Center, Sumter, SC
2005 - Sumter County Exhibition Center, Sumter, SC
2006 - Sumter County Exhibition Center, Sumter, SC
2007 - Sumter County Exhibition Center, Sumter, SC
2009 - Sumter County Exhibition Center, Sumter, SC
2010 - Sumter County Exhibition Center, Sumter, SC
2011 - Sumter County Civic Center, Sumter, SC
2012 - Sumter County Civic Center, Sumter, SC
2013 - Sumter County Civic Center, Sumter, SC

2014 - TBA